A “Person with Epilepsy” Abroad: First Update You Don’t Care About

I’m now in Cambridge seeing a friend whom I consider an aunt/second mother. Cambridge is my happy place; I feel uncharacteristically relaxed here. On the plane from Reykjavik to Heathrow, I was trying to figure our how many times I’ve visited. I estimated ten. Kinda crazy to think that this is my eleventh.

And now for a overly detailed report about what I’ve been doing and how things have been going.

November 26–27:

  1. I did the responsible thing and informed the flight attendant that I have a seizure disorder. She was super nice about it. In an amazing Icelandic accent, she said, “Please do not concern yourself. We have many of those in Iceland.” I wasn’t totally sure what she meant, but it was strangely comforting.
  2. I didn’t have a seizure on the plane! Victory! I also slept for two hours tops. Whoops.
  3. I ate skyr in the Reykjavik airport while waiting for my connection. I wanted a world-famous Icelandic hot dog, but for whatever reason, they aren’t sold at 6:30 AM. Weird.
  4. I managed to allow the UK immigration officer to handle my passport, reminding myself that I had no choice if I wanted to enter the country. I think this is called “exposure therapy.” I hate it.
  5. I took the tube to King’s Cross, took the train to Cambridge, and then met the friend I’m staying with to say hello before meeting a childhood friend and his family for a quick visit.
  6. I immediately began eating many of my favourite UK things, which include mediocre conveyor-belt sushi from a chain restaurant. My husband doesn’t understand why I’m so obsessed with this sushi, so since I know you’re reading this, A, let me sum it up for you using two words: predictability and novelty. Yes, it tasted exactly the same as it did the last time I was here, and yes, the conveyor belt gimmick again succeeded in making me consume significantly more than I should have.
  7. I was incredibly tired last night but went to bed all like, “tomorrow I’m going to take advantage of my one full day in Cambridge and do EVERYTHING.”
This was delicious. Full disclosure: I ate two of them.
This was delicious. Full disclosure: I ate two of them.

 

This was also highly enjoyable. I recommend the pumpkin korroke: it's prepared exactly the same way every single time I go, and I've gone at least eight times.
This was also highly enjoyable. I recommend the pumpkin korroke: it’s prepared exactly the same way every single time I go, and I’ve gone at least eight times.

Today:

  1. I woke up at 1 PM. This impeded my ability to carry out point 7 of the previous list.
  2. I sat around in a sleepy daze for a little while, suddenly realized that I was incredibly hungry, and ate. A lot.
  3. I had a lovely afternoon in the historic city centre.
  4. I had a fantastic exchange with a cashier at Marks and Spencer, who noticed my accent, asked if I’m American, and, after I told him I’m Canadian, asked if I know Drake (the conversation was much lengthier; if you want the non-paraphrased version, I’d be more than happy to provide it).
  5. I just finished eating Marks and Spencer moussaka, another of my favourite UK things. (Yeah, yeah.)
  6. I’m resisting the urge to go to bed. Since I’ve been awake for less than nine hours, it seems a little premature, plus I want to spend as much quality time with my friend as possible. The triple whammy of jet lag, Topamax fatigue, and the aftermath of a partial complex seizure I had last night are, however, really hitting me hard. Pouty face.
I was pleased to see that very little in Cambridge has changed, with the exception of that extremely classy Krispy Kreme, which is new. Congrats, Krispy Kreme: you've really made it.
I was pleased to see that very little in Cambridge has changed, with the exception of that extremely classy Krispy Kreme (bottom left). Congrats, Krispy Kreme: you’ve really made it.

Tomorrow I’ll leave Cambridge (sniff) and head to London (yay!).

KG out.

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